Two Submissions by Edwin Najmi – BJJ Fanatics

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If you have been training Jiu Jitsu, you have probably heard of Edwin Najmi. Edwin is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu black belt training out of California. Edwin began his martial arts training as a child and eventually progressed to become one of the most celebrated submission artists in the sport.

Edwin began his Brazilian Jiu Jitsu career after transitioning from Judo by training with another legendary Brazilian Jiu Jitsu practitioner, Romula Barral of Gracie Barra.

Edwin has won some of the most prestigious BJJ tournaments in the world including the IBJJF Worlds, IBBJF Pans, FIVE superleague, etc. Edwin specializes mostly in the gi, but is just as entertaining and skilled without it. He holds a grappling record of 43-18.

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The reason I became a big fan of Edwin is because he is constantly looking for submissions. Edwin is one of the few IBBJF competitors that is willing to put his reputation on the line and lose matches in favor of getting submissions. 

Edwin specializes in numerous different styles of submissions. The one submission that put him on the map is his quick and scary flying triangle. He also has a an excellent darce choke that will be discussed below.

Furthermore, Edwin also happens to be a skilled instructor that teaches with explicit attention to detail and elaboration. His explanations and modifications will help any grappler improve, regardless of what technique he is discussing.

Edwin currently has multiple instructionals out and numerous different Youtube videos to entertain is with. In one of his instructionals, Edwin teaches a submission few grapplers have mastered, the darce choke. In another BJJ Fanatics exclusive, Edwin teaches the triangle choke.

Let’s start with the darce choke, often referred to as the brabo choke. The darce choke a common head and arm submission like the anaconda and guillotine. Because it resembles the anaconda choke a lot, many newer students and even some blue belts get confused between the difference.

In the darce choke, the choking arm reaches from under the armpit all the way through until the hand reaches the far side of the neck. The supporting hand will grip at the elbow pit, similar to a rear naked choke grip.

There are a lot of different positions the darce choke can be attacked from such as turtle, side control, knee on belly. One of the most popular positions the darce choke can be set up from top half guard. In order to get the darce choke here, the bottom player needs first has to reach for an underhook. In the following video, Edwin shows us how to execute this set up. See below:

If you are going against an unskilled grappler that doesn’t understand how to use underhooks, the choke can be set up early and quick. When dealing with a skilled grappler, however, the set up becomes more sophisticated. This is because the underhook can be used to create space between the neck and shoulder, making the choke obsolete.

In order to counter this, we need to eliminate the underhook. Edwin does this by rolling onto his side while maintaining the choke grip. After rolling onto his side, he begins using his torso to push the underhook under him as he gets back to the top position.

I always had a hard time finishing the darce choke because of the underhook. Edwin’s modification for getting rid of the underhook has helped me tremendously and I am now hitting the darce choke way more.

Edwin is a master of more than just darce chokes and flying triangles. Edwin is always looking for effective submissions that he can hit on his opponents after they make a mistake. One of those submissions is an ankle lock known as the Estima lock.

In the following video, Edwin shows us how to hit the Estima lock from a standing position. The

The Estima lock is named after Victor and Braulio Estima, two Brazilian Jiu Jitsu blackbelts that are legends in the sport. See below:

Because the foot is placed on our abdomens in the Estima lock as opposed to on our side such as with heel hooks, it is a little bit trickier to finish and requires and understanding of how to use our torso to bend the foot. Furthermore, the Estima lock is best finished from a standing position since it gives the best leverage to break the ankle. The Estima locks power, however, comes from the fact that grapplers don’t often expect it.

If you liked these two techniques by Edwin Najmi, I highly recommend looking into his instructionals from BJJ Fanatics. They are so detailed yet simple that they can help students from any rank improve their submission game. 

Check Out Edwin Najmi’s DVD “Mission Submission” and learn how to find submissions from everywhere and become lethal! Check it out here!

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