Teaching the Young Dogs New Tricks – BJJ Fanatics

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 Masters Level Black Belt Wins Adult Roosterweight Gold

Not everyone who puts on a Gi or steps on BJJ training mats will achieve their black belt.  Not everyone who signs up at their local jiu jitsu academy will ever compete.  Very few who achieve their black belts and compete during their journey will ever experience the glory of winning a gold medal at a high level event. 

Even fewer practitioners over the age of 30, who choose to continue testing themselves in the Adult Divisions, even though they qualify for the Masters level will achieve gold.  Marcelo Cohen, Florida-based black belt and grappling coach at the Armory did just that this past weekend at the 2019 Miami Winter Open. 

Let this black belt rooster weight teach you his devastating kimura game!  Click Learn More!

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BJJ Fanatics caught up with Cohen to ask him a few questions about his journey, his thoughts on competing and how he came to become known for a wicked kimura game.  Check it out below!

How did you get into jiu jitsu?

I started my martial arts training in Judo at the age of 9. At the age of 16, my uncle who was a Jiu Jitsu Blackbelt introduced me to Jiu Jitsu and I have been training since then.

Do you think everyone who practices should compete?

No, I don’t think everyone should or needs to compete. There are people in Jiu Jitsu for so many other reasons. For some people it’s enough for them to push themselves in their gym with their training partners.

Do you even kimura bro?  Click Learn More!

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Why is it important to you to compete in Adult tournaments as a qualifying masters level competitor? 

I’m 35 years old. For me it’s important to compete at the adult level because the rounds are longer and the competitors are younger with more strength and stamina which pushes me to be better. Most of the recognition in Jiu Jitsu goes to the adult level competitors and I believe that I need to compete at that level to keep myself in the forefront of the sport. Most sponsors are looking for people who constantly put their name and face out there and there is no better way to do that than to continually test yourself again the best.

How would you characterize your BJJ game? Your competition style?

I would describe my BJJ game and competition style as very aggressive and always looking for the finish.

What advice would you give to someone who is thinking about doing their first tournament?

For people thinking about doing their first tournament I would tell them to just try their best and go in with no expectations. Stay positive and try to use it as a learning experience.

Talk to me about how your kimura game developed? What led you to specialize in this technique over others?

I like the kimura because it’s not only a submission, but a controlling position. You can use it to control your opponent and move to another position. Your opponent is always on the defense when you have the kimura locked. It can be used successfully with someone of any size. It’s really just a position that comes very natural to me, I feel very confident and comfortable in that position.

Who are the athletes, coaches, etc. that inspire you today?

I am inspired by of course my Professor, Marcelo Saporito and everyone in Jiu Jitsu that is actively trying to pursue their dream, everyone that is pushing themselves to be the very best they can.

Anything you’d like to add Professor Cohen?

The only thing that I would like to add is that the guys that qualify for the masters division should get a little extra credit and respect. It’s not easy at this age to push your body to compete against all these young guys. I see a lot of instructors telling their students to push themselves, but the second they hit 30 they run to the safety of the masters division. If you’re telling your students to push themselves, so should you. Get out of your comfort zone and test yourself against the best that’s out there, and the best is found in the adult division.

 Check out Professor Cohen’s finals match at this past weekend’s Miami Winter Open.

 You can get yourself a copy of Marcelo Cohen’s “Kimura System” here at BJJ Fanatics and learn how he uses it not just as a submission, but also as a powerful controlling position that can open up many other avenues of attack for you against your opponents.  Get it here now from BJJ Fanatics!

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