3 Turtle Guard Techniques With Edurado Telles – BJJ Fanatics

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3 Turtle Guard Techniques With Edurado Telles

Eduardo Telles is a living legend. Known as one of the most innovative grapplers of his generation Eduardo Telles is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu black belt under Fabio Gurgel and a high level competitor with many accolades. Eduardo is at the top of his game right now. He was been for at least two decades. His list of accomplishments is great. He was victories in some of the sport’s most prestigious international titles including World Champion, Pan American Champion, Brazilian National Champion, and many, many more. Eduardo is known for his style of “weird jiu jitsu.” He is a a true creator, and has revolutionized the sport with his infamous turtle guard position. He is also know for his trademark set up, the Octupus guard.

Judo players use the turtle position to stall and wait to be stood back up. So it’s no surprise that Travis Stevens is a master at attacking from the turtle position for a variety of chokes and arm bars.

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Eduardo Telles has a great instructional series “Turtle Guard Revisited” available exclusively on BJJFanatics.com. Are you interested in adding some new and unique moves to your bag of tricks? Do you want to be the guy on the mats who others just can’t figure out? Well if so, then this Turtle Guard instructional series from Eduardo Telles is just the thing you need. Let’s take a look at what Eduardo has to offer us. Keep in mind, Eduardo is not only a legendary competitor; he is a remarkable coach as well. With that said, let’s have a look a three of the techniques you can find on this series.

#1: Leap Trap From Knee Cut by Eduardo Telles

This leg trap is great in a situation where your training partner tries to pass your guard using a knee cut. If you are playing bottom half guard and your opponent stands, they will often time use a knee cut to control your bottom leg. This is a very common problem most BJJ players face at one point or another. But that’s no worry, because Eduardo’s technique is perfect for this situation. He does not hesitate to counter when his partner goes for the knee slice. Eduardo sits back up to trap his opponent’s foot. It is likely your training partner will have a cross collar grip, which can make this technique hard to do. So to get around this Eduardo passes the arm around the back of his neck before securing the turtle position. You can always using the turtle position when your training partner’s knee goes the way you would expect it to when going for the knee cut.

#2: Butterfly Trap: Kimura From Turtle Guard

Now this one is really cool: the butterfly trap. It’s a deceptive submission that anyone can do. Eduardo starts this technique in a seated position looking to establish first contact with his training partner. First contact is very important. You want to get your hand and feet positioning right in order to do this technique properly. Pay attention to how Eduardo places his feet inside, with one hand on his training partner’s wrist and one on the shoulder. Now, Eduardo can put his knee in his training partner’s hip. He also over hooks his opponent’s arm which maintaining wrist connection. You will notice this deliberately allows your opponent access to your back. Trust me, it is all part of the plan.

Your training partner “thinks” they have an easy back take. But what is really happening here is that you are baiting them into a kimura. Notice Eduardo’s leg placement. His opponent never really has his back. As soon as your training partner goes for your back all you need to do is go into half guard and trap his leg. Look at that! The kimura is right there. You can grab the lapel to help you finish the kimura.

#3: Side Control To Steam Roller

I have saved the best for last. I absolutely love this move. Side control is also a great position because it is always being innovated on and improved, and because of this it can be one of the hardest positions to escape, especially if you are a bigger guy. Eduardo starts this one off with a simple piece of advice: turn the opposite direction – away from your opponent. You will notice this gives your training partner your back. This is intentional, as it was with the butterfly trap. Place your hand under your opponent’s jaw. This will allow you a little space to free your hand. Now you can frame and create space. Once you have some space, simply roll away from your opponent. Most times your training partner will roll through with you, which is okay.  Get to your knees, establish your turtle and roll back into closed guard.

The great thing about the turtle guard is that it is a little unusual, which people are not expecting. No matter where you are, you can almost always find your way into turtle guard. And it is a truly interesting technique because it actually allows you to set up sweeps and submissions in ways that most guys just will not see coming. So check out Eduardo Telles’ “Turtle Guard Revisited” available right here on BJJFanatics if you want some really sick techniques that will leave your opponent’s frustrated and confused.

Travis Stevens Judo-based system for attacking and defending the turtle (if you’re not familiar with the turtle – this is when your opponent gets in a tight little ball on all fours) will give you an unfair advantage over your opponents… especially when they turtle up and just stalllllll.  Travis Stevens’ didn’t learn to attack the turtle doing BJJ – he learned it doing Judo.  In Judo, opponents use the turtle all the time.  The rules state that most of the match takes place on the feet, and once it hits the ground an opponent risks little by going there. Out of necessity, Travis developed a system for destroying anyone who tried to stall him on the ground and he has become one of the most successful American Judokas ever.

Now you can learn his system for dealing with those BORING STALLERS who refuse to come out of their shell with a step by step system for smashing through their turtle and submitting them at will.

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