3 No Gi Techniques For BJJ From John Danaher – BJJ Fanatics

Share the joy


Improve Your No Gi Game With Techniques From One Of The Most Sought Out Instructors In The World.. John Danaher

John Danaher is a man who needs no introduction. Danaher is the most sought after grappling instructor in the world. As the leader of the Danaher Death Squad, he is known for completely revolutionizing modern Brazilian Jiu Jitsu by making leg attacks, which were once taboo, a grappling norm. Danaher has an extraordinary ability to speak about grappling concepts in a way I have never heard anyone else do it. I think that is what makes him so popular in the sport. He is a legendary coach, and has produced high level students like Tom DeBlass and Gordon Ryan. Let’s take a look at what makes Danaher such an amazing instructor. Here are 3 no gi techniques for BJJ from John Danaher!

Even though The Danaher Death Squad guys are known for their leg locks… and now triangles, John Danaher also is a master of explaining and breaking down the kimura attack system.

LEARN MORE

How To Do The Perfect Kimura From Side Control

If you have ever gone for a kimura from side control but have not been able to finish the submission, it is likely the concepts in this video can greatly improve your effectiveness. In this video, John Danaher demonstrates a concept he calls the “power line” which is a line of power and control over your opponent that goes diagonally across him rather than perpendicular. Both of your hands are involved in the kimura. One of your hands does the pushing while the other does the pulling. In any kimura, Danaher will have a hand on his training partner’s wrist. This is the hand he uses primarily for pushing or immobilizing his training partner’s wrist. The second hand locks up in such a way that you can exert a pulling force on your training partner.

Now, John Danaher breaks down the most common mistake people do not even know they are making when they try to finish the kimura. When we work the kimura from side control there is a real danger that you will end up with a push dominant kimura. As a general rule, you want to operate with a pull dominant kimura rather than a push dominant kimura. You want the majority of the force of the kimura to come from the pulling tension that happens from immobilizing the arm. Rather than working on a perpendicular line across your opponent’s chest, what you want to do is work at the line of his shoulders. If you position your hips up on the shoulder line you are in a better position to form the “power line.” This is the line where you derive power from, somewhere between the north and south position. You can see any amount of lift with one hand in a situation like this puts extreme tension in your opponent’s shoulder. That is exactly what you are looking for when doing a kimura from side control.

Near Side Entires

In this video Danaher demonstrates his approach for taking a person’s back when they are in the turtle position. If your training partner is very defensive in the turtle this is a create technique to break down their position. The first thing to remember when taking the back is to recognize how your own body position influences your approach. Secure a grip on your training partner’s wrist and establish a seat belt grip. From here you should work towards placing a knee inside your opponent’s turtle position. Try to place your knee between the thigh and elbow. This will start to break down your opponent’s posture. Turn your knee towards your opponent’s hips, creating a tension point that will allow you to move to the back. Danaher calls this method a “low amplitude” back take as it does not require any highly technical knowledge to pull off.

Inside Tie Side to Side Snap Downs

The hardest part of the standing head lock position is how you enter. The goal should be to get the crown of your opponent’s head below the level of your arm pit. If you can do this, you are going to get a lot of successful front head locks on your opponent. The snap down is the perfect way to do this. As you move in towards your training partner your hands and arms should occupy the inside center line. This position allows you to snap your training partner’s head down. Danaher brings his training partner’s head to his elbow. Now as his head comes up in response to that he switches to his other arm and repeats the process. By taking your opponent’s head from side to side from an inside tie you will often create tremendous off balancing, setting up front head lock entries.

I am sure you now understand why John Danaher is one of the most sought out instructors in the world. His ability to address problems using fundamental concepts from an advanced approach is what keeps people continually seeking out his instruction. If you are interesting in more from John Danaher then check out his 5 instructional series that are available exclusively on BJJFanatics.com! Danaher has a wide variety of instructions available from kimuras, to leg locks, triangles, front head locks, and back attacks. These instructional series will help you advanced your game quickly and efficiently, giving you a huge advantage over your opponent – even the bigger guys in the gym!

The Most Comprehensive Course On Triangles Ever Created – By The Greatest Grappling Coach On Earth

  • John Danaher Calls The Triangle The Most Versatile Submission There Is
  • In Triangles: Enter The System He Shows All Of the Setups, Chokes, And Armlocks That Will Make This Become Your Go To Move From Bottom Or Top
  • John draws back the curtain and lets you in on all of his secrets
  • John Danaher has become the best known and most sought-after grappling coach on Earth
  • Transform your entire game

 

BUY NOW




Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *